A community organization in Oakville, whose concern is the overuse of noisy, polluting leaf blowers


Does raking take more time?


Rake It or Blow it?  A well chosen rake used in conjunction with a tarp hits the efficiency 'sweet spot', whereas leaf blowers are obvious OVERKILL. Piling up leaves from the lawn should always be done with rakes, or mulched by a lawn mower to PRESERVE TOPSOIL, essential for a healthy lawn. A comfortable rake, used in conjunction with a tarp, is equivalent to the time spent by leaf blower operators, who unconsciously tend to OVER-DO their blowing, as though playing with a noisy powerful toy! Rake the leaves onto a tarp, pull back the tarp a couple of meters and repeat until the tarp is sufficiently full. Then drag the tarp to a corner of the property and dump, composting the leaves behind some bushes. Minimal bending is involved and zero bagging.

Comments Dr. Ted Mitchell: “In this fashion, I spend less than half the time and effort of any of my neighbours, whether they use rakes or leaf blowers, and I puzzle over why anyone would do differently if they have a large property”.

Grandmother Proves Rake and Broom as Fast as Leaf Blowers

In a test between raking and leaf blowers set up by a task force of the Los Angeles City Council, Diane Wolfberg, a California grandmother in her late 50s, proved that she was just as fast as gas-powered and electric leaf blowers, and did a better job in cleaning up the areas.

www.nonoise.org/quietnet/cqs/leafblow.htm#grandma

 

The benefits of raking


Rakes are easy to use by people of all ages and abilities, and a healthy way to keep fit and strengthen muscles. It can be done entirely at one’s own pace, and primarily uses the large efficient muscles of the back. The effort level is that of a brisk walk, considerably easier than shovelling snow, using a reel lawn mower, or even a push broom. Done properly, with frequent switching of sides, it is unlikely to cause acute or overuse injury, certainly much less than activities with repeated bending, twisting, and lifting.

Comments Dr. Ted Mitchell: “My 90 year old neighbour with two artificial hips still rakes both his own and his daughter’s yard”.